International COVID-19 fraud exposed

A sophisticated fraud scheme using compromised emails, advance-payment fraud and money laundering has been uncovered by financial institutions and authorities across Germany, Ireland and the Netherlands


INTERPOL-coordinated case leads to arrests and sparks investigations around Europe

A sophisticated fraud scheme using compromised emails, advance-payment fraud and money laundering has been uncovered by financial institutions and authorities across Germany, Ireland and the Netherlands, as part of a case coordinated by INTERPOL.

In mid-March, as a number of countries were going into lock-down due to the coronavirus outbreak, German health authorities contracted two sales companies in Zurich and Hamburg to procure EUR 15 million worth of face masks. With a global shortage on medical supplies complicating usual business channels, the buyers followed new leads in the hopes of securing the masks.

It all started with an email address and website which appeared to be linked to a legitimate company in Spain selling face masks. Unbeknownst to the buyers, the site was a fake and their legitimate email addresses had been compromised.

Through email correspondence, the company initially claimed to have 10 million masks, only for the delivery to fall through. As consolation, they then referred the buyers to a ‘trusted’ dealer in Ireland. The Irish middleman promised to put them in touch with a different supplier, this time in the Netherlands.

Claiming to have a strong commercial relationship with the company, the man provided assurances that the alleged Dutch company would be able to supply the 10 million face masks. An agreement for an initial delivery of 1.5 million masks was made, in exchange for an up-front payment of EUR 1.5 million.

The buyers initiated a bank transfer to Ireland and prepared for delivery, which involved 52 lorries and a police escort to transport the masks from a warehouse in the Netherlands to the final destination in Germany.

Just before the delivery date, the buyers were informed that the funds had not been received and that an emergency transfer of EUR 880,000 straight to the Dutch supplier was required to secure the merchandise.

When the buyers realized they had been duped, they immediately contacted their bank in Germany, which in turn contacted INTERPOL’s Financial Crimes unit, setting off a race to intercept the funds and follow the money trail.

Banks, financial intelligence units and judicial authorities, as well as partner organizations Europol and EUROJUST, joined INTERPOL in the chase.

INTERPOL contacted its National Central Bureau in Dublin as well as the Irish bank. Prompt intervention by the Garda National Economic Crime Bureau allowed them to freeze the 1.5 million in the account and identify the Irish company involved.

The Dutch Fiscal Information and Investigation Service quickly tracked down the EUR 880,000 which had been transferred from the German company. Nearly EUR 500,000 of those funds had already been sent to the United Kingdom, all of which was destined for an account in Nigeria.

Europol activated its professional networks to reach key contacts in the banking sector. Thanks to an alert raised by investigators, the UK bank was able to recall the full amount. Those funds have now been returned to the Netherlands and frozen by authorities.

“They adapted their sales pitches to take advantage of strained supply chains and generate huge profits. I can only salute the quick work of both the private and public authorities involved. INTERPOL will continue its work on the case – and the many others like it – in close cooperation with all of our partners,” added the INTERPOL Chief.

The operation has already led to the arrest of two suspects in the Netherlands. More arrests are likely as specialized units continue to liaise closely with INTERPOL, as well as the public prosecutor and police forces in Traunstein (Germany) on leads generated by seized devices.

INTERPOL would like to remind members of the public to be vigilant as organized crime groups continue to adapt their activities to benefit from the global health crisis.

Interpol.int (April 2020) Unmasked: International COVID-19 fraud exposed

Georgia Man Arrested for Attempting to Defraud the Department of Veterans Affairs in a Multimillion-Dollar COVID-19 Scam


Christopher Parris, a 39-year-old Atlanta, Georgia resident, was arrested today and charged in federal court in the District of Columbia (Washington DC) with fraud for attempting to sell millions of nonexistent respirator masks to the Department of Veterans Affairs in exchange for large upfront payments, the Justice Department announced.

The criminal complaint charges Parris with wire fraud.  It alleges that he made and caused to be made a series of fraudulent misrepresentations in an attempt to secure orders from the Department of Veterans Affairs for 125 million face masks and other personal protective equipment (PPE) that would have totaled over $750 million.  

For example, the complaint alleges that Parris promised that he could obtain millions of genuine 3M masks from domestic factories when he knew that fulfilling the orders would not be possible.  Parris also allegedly made similar false representations to other entities in an effort to enter into other fraudulent agreements to sell PPE to state governments.

“We will vigorously pursue fraudsters who exploit the COVID-19 pandemic to make money,” said Attorney General William Barr.  “As this case demonstrates, even beyond the typical costs associated with unlawful behavior, COVID-19 scams divert government time and resources and risk preventing front-line responders and consumers from obtaining the equipment they need to combat this pandemic.  The Department of Justice will not tolerate this conduct, especially when it involves this kind of egregious attempt to target and defraud our nation’s treasures – our veterans.”

After arrest, Parris appeared before Chief United States Magistrate Judge Alan J. Baverman in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, where he was ordered detained.  Parris will be extradited to the District of Columbia (DC).

“During this time of crisis, fraud or attempted fraud impacting services for veterans, who have selflessly served this country, is unconscionable,” said U.S. Attorney Timothy Shea for the District of Columbia.  “My office will devote whatever resources are necessary to stop scams aimed at exploiting Americans during this unprecedented pandemic.”

“We are committed to protecting the integrity of taxpayer funds and ensuring the delivery of medical supplies necessary to provide quality healthcare to our nation’s veterans, and any attempt to exploit the current global COVID-19 pandemic for personal gain will be dealt with swiftly,” said Inspector General Michael J. Missal for the Department of Veterans Affairs.  “Today’s charges are the direct result of the expeditious and tireless efforts of special agents of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Inspector General, working in tandem with our law enforcement partners at the Department of Justice and Homeland Security Investigations.”

“Homeland Security Investigations special agents have sworn an oath to protect the American public, particularly during this health crisis, from opportunistic individuals who seek to deliberately harm and deceive others for their own profit,” said Special Agent in Charge Jere T. Miles, Homeland Security Investigations – New Orleans.  “Today, our special agents have shown their commitment to that promise.”

A criminal complaint is an accusation by a federal law enforcement agent, and defendants are entitled to the presumption of innocence unless proven guilty.  Upon conviction for the wire fraud charge, the maximum statutory penalty is 20 years’ imprisonment and a $250,000 fine.

The Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of the Inspector General and Homeland Security Investigations investigated the case.  Trial Attorney Patrick Runkle of the Department of Justice’s Consumer Protection Branch and Assistant U.S. Attorneys Peter Lallas and Zia Faruqui of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia are prosecuting the case.  Assistant U.S. Attorneys Alison Prout and Theodore S. Hertzberg of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia provided substantial assistance.

Information about the Consumer Protection Branch and its enforcement efforts may be found at http://www.justice.gov/civil/consumer-protection-branch.  For more information about the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia, visit its website at https://www.justice.gov/usao-dc.  

The public is urged to report suspected fraud schemes related to COVID-19 (the Coronavirus) by calling the National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) hotline (1-866-720-5721) or by e-mailing the NCDF at disaster@leo.gov.

Justice.gov (April 2020) Georgia Man Arrested for Attempting to Defraud the Department of Veterans Affairs in a Multimillion-Dollar COVID-19 Scam

U.S. Attorney David C. Joseph Launches Federal Task Force to Investigate and Prosecute COVID-19 Fraud and Hoarding of Critical Medical Supplies


In response to the evidence that fraud schemes are being developed around the country to exploit the coronavirus epidemic, U.S. Attorney David C. Joseph announced today that he has formed a task force in the Western District of Louisiana to identify, investigate, prosecute, and dismantle fraud schemes designed to unlawfully profit from the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The Western District of Louisiana’s COVID-19 Fraud Task Force (Task Force) brings together multiple federal investigative agencies under the leadership of the U.S. Attorney’s Office to share and receive intelligence related to the scams being perpetrated on-line and in-person by individuals seeking to exploit the evolving public health crisis.

The Task Force will then marshal the collective investigative power of our federal law enforcement agencies by forming joint investigative teams to work with prosecutors from the U.S. Attorney’s Office. 

The Task Force will be led by the U.S. Attorney’s Office COVID-19 Fraud Coordinator, Assistant U.S. Attorney Seth D. Reeg. The Task Force members include representatives from the United States Attorney’s Office, FBI, U.S. Department of Homeland Security – Office of Inspector General,  U.S. Food and Drug Administration – Criminal Investigations, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Investigations/ Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Department of Veteran’s Administration – Office of Inspector General, United States Secret Service, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Office of Inspector General, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Federal Trade Commission, and the Small Business Administration – Office of Inspector General.

“The public should know that my office remains fully operational during the COVID-19 pandemic and will be focusing on those who seek to unlawfully exploit others during this difficult time,” said U.S. Attorney Joseph. “The last thing our community needs as we come together to fight this pandemic are certain individuals among us preying upon the fears of others for financial gain.  Through the formation of this Task Force, federal prosecutors from my office will collaborate on a daily basis with investigators to identify, investigate, and aggressively prosecute those attempting to profit from this emergency.  I want to thank all of the agencies and federal agents that are joining us in this effort – each of which brings considerable expertise to the fight.”

The Task Force will review and investigate all credible leads of fraud associated with the coronavirus pandemic, focusing on those hoarding or price-gouging critical medical supplies and schemes designed to exploit vulnerable populations, including the elderly and those who may be more susceptible to the disease due to pre-existing health conditions. The Task Force will also prioritize schemes that have the potential to endanger public health and safety. AUSA Reeg will meet and confer with agency counterparts on a regular basis to prioritize cases and surge resources where needed.

Some examples of COVID-19 scams include:

  • Unlawful Hoarding and Price-Gouging: The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has designated certain health and medical resources necessary to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic as “scarce,” including respirator masks, ventilators, and other medical protective equipment. These designated materials are subject to the hoarding prevention measures that trigger both criminal and civil remedies. Yesterday, U.S. Attorney Joseph sent a letter to area hospitals and medical providers requesting information regarding any known hoarding or price-gouging of critical medical supplies.
  • Testing Scams: Scammers are selling fake at-home test kits or going door-to-door performing fake tests for money.
  • Treatment Scams: Scammers are offering to sell fake cures, vaccines, and advice on unproven treatments for COVID-19.
  • Supply Scams: Scammers are creating fake shops, websites, social media accounts, and email addresses claiming to sell medical supplies currently in high demand, such as surgical masks. When consumers attempt to purchase supplies through these channels, fraudsters pocket the money and never provide the promised supplies.
  • Provider Scams: Scammers are also contacting people by phone and email, pretending to be doctors and hospitals that have treated a friend or relative for COVID-19, and demanding payment for that treatment.
  • Charity Scams: Scammers are soliciting donations for individuals, groups, and areas affected by COVID-19.
  • Phishing Scams and Cyber Intrusions: Scammers posing as national and global health authorities, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are sending phishing emails designed to trick recipients into clicking on a link or opening an attachment that downloads malware, or providing personal identifying financial information. One form of malware being spread contains an interactive online map of coronavirus-infected areas purportedly produced by Johns Hopkins University. Once someone downloads this interactive map, the malware steals the user’s credentials, such as usernames, credit card numbers, passwords, and other sensitive information usually stored in internet browsers.
  • App Scams: Scammers are also creating and manipulating mobile apps designed to track the spread of COVID-19 to insert malware that will compromise users’ devices and personal information.
  • Investment Scams: Scammers are offering online promotions on various platforms, including social media, claiming that the products or services of publicly traded companies can prevent, detect, or cure COVID-19, and that the stock of these companies will dramatically increase in value as a result. These promotions are often styled as “research reports,” make predictions of a specific “target price,” and relate to microcap stocks, or low-priced stocks issued by the smallest of companies with limited publicly available information.
  • $1,000 Check Scams: Scammers are contacting people over email and are telling them that their $1,000 check, as part of the stimulus package responding to COVID-19, is already waiting for them and that all they need to do is to provide personal information, such as bank account numbers and Social Security Numbers, which are the key pieces of information needed to perpetrate identity theft.
  • Other scams include fraudsters claiming to work for the government or banks/credit cards and offering assistance for student loan relief, foreclosure or eviction relief, unemployment assistance, debt relief, and direct financial assistance, like government checks.

U.S. Attorney Joseph urges everyone, especially those most at risk of serious illness, to avoid these and similar scams by taking the following steps:

  • Independently verify the identity of any company, charity, or individual that contacts you regarding COVID-19.
  • Check the websites and email addresses offering information, products, or services related to COVID-19. Be aware that scammers often employ addresses that differ only slightly from those belonging to the entities they are impersonating. For example, they might use “cdc.com” or “cdc.org” instead of “cdc.gov.”
  • Be wary of unsolicited emails offering information, supplies, or treatment for COVID-19 or requesting your personal information for medical purposes. Legitimate health authorities will not contact the general public this way.
  • Do not click on links or open email attachments from unknown or unverified sources. Doing so could download a virus onto your computer or device.
  • Make sure the anti-malware and anti-virus software on your computer is operating and up to date.
  • Ignore offers for a COVID-19 vaccine, cure, or treatment. Remember, if there is a medical breakthrough, you won’t hear about it for the first time through an email, online ad, or unsolicited sales pitch.
  • Check online reviews of any company offering COVID-19 products or supplies. Avoid companies whose customers have complained about not receiving items.
  • Research any charities or crowdfunding sites soliciting donations in connection with COVID- 19 before giving. Remember, an organization may not be legitimate even if it uses words like “CDC” or “government” in its name or has reputable looking seals or logos on its materials. For online resources on donating wisely, visit the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) website.
  • Be wary of any business, charity, or individual requesting payments or donations in cash, by wire transfer, gift card, or through the mail. Don’t send money through any of these channels.
  • Be cautious of “investment opportunities” tied to COVID-19, especially those based on claims that a small company’s products or services can help stop the virus. If you decide to invest, carefully research the investment beforehand. For information on how to avoid investment fraud, visit the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) website.
  • For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) websites.

Leaders from the federal law enforcement agencies participating in the Task Force provided the following comments in support of the mission:

“Even through a worldwide pandemic, the FBI remains steadfast in our mission to protect the American people and uphold the Constitution,” said Special Agent in Charge Bryan A. Vorndran of the FBI New Orleans Field Office. “Special Agents and Analysts of the WDLA COVID-19 Task Force are committed to investigating all forms of COVID-19 fraud committed on Louisiana residents. Any company or individual who attempts to defraud our residents and steal their money during this national crisis will be investigated and brought to justice.”

Soffe Men’s 3 Pack-USA Poly Cotton Military Tee

According to Joseph Cuffari, PhD., Inspector General, Department of Homeland Security, “The theft of FEMA funds resulting from COVID-19 schemes or false claims result in losses not only to the U.S. Taxpayer, but also to the actual victims who needed those funds to recover. Working with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General will continue our commitment to identify and aggressively investigate allegations of fraud. Theft of funds from DHS programs intended to help those in need will not be tolerated.”

“The FDA is fully committed to working with our federal partners to protect Americans from fraudulent and potentially dangerous medical products being marketed and distributed to Americans for the treatment or diagnosis of COVID-19. We will continue to take appropriate action to protect consumers from bad actors who take advantage of a crisis and place profits ahead of the public health,” said Judith A. McMeekin, Pharm.D., Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs, U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“Our HSI agents are deeply committed to the safety of the American public, whether it’s investigating and dismantling human trafficking operations or ensuring our medical communities are receiving legitimate medical equipment and supplies to combat the spread of Covid-19,” said New Orleans Special Agent in Charge Jere T. Miles. “Those who would use this pandemic to defraud their neighbors, friends, and communities for their own financial gain – we will be looking for you and we will find you.”

“The VA Office of Inspector General is dedicated to preserving the integrity of the public funds and medical resources intended to treat all veterans, including those impacted by COVID-19, and is pleased to join the U.S. Attorney’s Office and other federal law enforcement agencies in establishing this partnership.” – James Ross, Special Agent in Charge, VA Office of Inspector General, South Central Field Office.

If you believe you have been a target or victim of a scam or fraud or have knowledge of any hoarding or price-gouging of critical medical supplies, you can report it without leaving your home, to the National Center for Disaster Fraud Hotline at 1-866-720-5721 or via email at www.disaster@leo.gov.

The Western District of Louisiana Coronavirus Fraud Coordinator, AUSA Seth Reeg, can be reached at: (318) 676-3600.

Justice.gov (March 2020) U.S. Attorney David C. Joseph Launches Federal Task Force to Investigate and Prosecute COVID-19 Fraud and Hoarding of Critical Medical Supplies

Justice Department Files Its First Enforcement Action Against COVID-19 Fraud

The Department of Justice announced today that it has taken its first action in federal court to combat fraud related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.


Federal Court Issues Temporary Restraining Order Against Website Offering Fraudulent Coronavirus Vaccine

The Department of Justice announced today that it has taken its first action in federal court to combat fraud related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  

The enforcement action filed today in Austin against operators of a fraudulent website follows Attorney General William Barr’s recent direction for the department to prioritize the detection, investigation, and prosecution of illegal conduct related to the pandemic.

As detailed in the civil complaint and accompanying court papers filed on Saturday, March 21, 2020, the operators of the website “coronavirusmedicalkit.com” are engaging in a wire fraud scheme seeking to profit from the confusion and widespread fear surrounding COVID-19.  

Information published on the website claimed to offer consumers access to World Health Organization (WHO) vaccine kits in exchange for a shipping charge of $4.95, which consumers would pay by entering their credit card information on the website.  

In fact, there are currently no legitimate COVID-19 vaccines and the WHO is not distributing any such vaccine.  In response to the department’s request, U.S. District Judge Robert Pitman issued a temporary restraining order requiring that the registrar of the fraudulent website immediately take action to block public access to it.

“The Department of Justice will not tolerate criminal exploitation of this national emergency for personal gain,” said Assistant Attorney General Jody Hunt of the Department of Justice’s Civil Division.  “We will use every resource at the government’s disposal to act quickly to shut down these most despicable of scammers, whether they are defrauding consumers, committing identity theft, or delivering malware.”

“Attorney General Barr has directed the department to prioritize fraud schemes arising out of the coronavirus emergency,” said U.S. Attorney John F. Bash of the Western District of Texas.  “We therefore moved very quickly to shut down this scam.  We hope in the future that responsible web domain registrars will quickly and effectively shut down websites designed to facilitate these scams.  My office will continue to be aggressive in targeting these sorts of despicable frauds for the duration of this emergency.”

“At a time when we face such unprecedented challenges with the COVID-19 crisis, Americans are understandably desperate to find solutions to keep their families safe and healthy,” said Special Agent in Charge Christopher Combs of the FBI’s San Antonio Field Office.  “Fraudsters who seek to profit from their fear and uncertainty, by selling bogus vaccines or cures, not only steal limited resources from our communities, they pose an even greater danger by spreading misinformation and creating confusion.  During this difficult time, protecting our communities from these reprehensible fraud schemes will remain one of the FBI’s highest priorities.”

The United States filed today’s announced action to shutter the website immediately while an investigation of the website and its operators continues.  In so doing, the government is employing a federal statute that permits federal courts to issue injunctions to prevent harm to potential victims of fraudulent schemes.

The Department of Justice recommends that Americans to take the following precautionary measures to protect themselves from known and emerging scams related to COVID-19:

  • Independently verify the identity of any company, charity, or individual that contacts you regarding COVID-19.
  • Check the websites and email addresses offering information, products, or services related to COVID-19. Be aware that scammers often employ addresses that differ only slightly from those belonging to the entities they are impersonating.  For example, they might use “cdc.com” or “cdc.org” instead of “cdc.gov.”
  • Be wary of unsolicited emails offering information, supplies, or treatment for COVID-19 or requesting your personal information for medical purposes. Legitimate health authorities will not contact the general public this way.
  • Do not click on links or open email attachments from unknown or unverified sources. Doing so could download a virus onto your computer or device.
  • Make sure the anti-malware and anti-virus software on your computer is operating and up to date.
  • Ignore offers for a COVID-19 vaccine, cure, or treatment. Remember, if a vaccine becomes available, you won’t hear about it for the first time through an email, online ad, or unsolicited sales pitch.
  • Check online reviews of any company offering COVID-19 products or supplies. Avoid companies whose customers have complained about not receiving items.
  • Research any charities or crowdfunding sites soliciting donations in connection with COVID-19 before giving any donation. Remember, an organization may not be legitimate even if it uses words like “CDC” or “government” in its name or has reputable looking seals or logos on its materials.  For online resources on donating wisely, visit the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) website.
  • Be wary of any business, charity, or individual requesting payments or donations in cash, by wire transfer, gift card, or through the mail. Don’t send money through any of these channels.
  • Be cautious of “investment opportunities” tied to COVID-19, especially those based on claims that a small company’s products or services can help stop the virus. If you decide to invest, carefully research the investment beforehand.  For information on how to avoid investment fraud, visit the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) website.

For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, consumers may visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and WHO websites. 

In addition, the public is urged to report suspected fraud schemes related to COVID-19 by calling the National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) hotline (1-866-720-5721) or by e-mailing the NCDF at disaster@leo.gov.

The enforcement action taken today is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Thomas A. Parnham, Jr. and Michael C. Galdo of the Western District of Texas, and Senior Litigation Counsel Ross S. Goldstein of the Civil Division’s Consumer Protection Branch.  The FBI’s San Antonio Field Office is conducting the investigation.

The claims made in the complaint are allegations that, if the case were to proceed to trial, the government must prove to receive a permanent injunction against the defendant.

For information about the Department of Justice’s efforts to stop COVID-19 fraud, visit www.justice.gov/coronavirus.  Additional information about the Consumer Protection Branch and its enforcement efforts may be found at www.justice.gov/civil/consumer-protection-branch.  For more information about the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Texas, visit its website at www.justice.gov/usao-wdtx.

Justice.gov (March 2020) Justice Department Files Its First Enforcement Action Against COVID-19 Fraud

CBP Officers in El Paso Seize Large Shipment of Altered and Prohibited Household Cleaning Products


Smuggling can be a dirty business even when it involves cleaning supplies.

CBP officers working at the Bridge of the Americas commercial import facility at the El Paso port of entry, learned this when they encountered a large shipment of what appeared to be cleaning supplies arriving from Mexico on March 16.

The products appeared to be tampered with and prohibited for sale in the U.S.

“In the current environment it is reprehensible that someone would attempt a scheme like this to prey upon the concerns and fears of our community, likely for financial gain,” said CBP El Paso Director of Field Operations Hector Mancha. “Our officers remain focused and attentive to all threats they may encounter.”

During the inspection, the driver of a box truck presented CBP officers with a manifest showing the shipment included cleaning supplies and toilet paper. CBP officers selected the shipment for inspection and found that it contained 168 boxes of Clorox bleach (127 oz.), 75 boxes of Pinol cleaner (33.81 oz.), 28 boxes of Fabuloso cleaner (169 oz.), 23 boxes of Pinol cleaner (27.99 oz.), 9 boxes of Clorox cleaner (31.44 oz.), and 20 boxes of Adorable brand toilet paper.

During a dock exam of the products inspection, CBP officers and National Guard soldiers noted that many of the bottles had no safety seals and appeared to have been tampered with. Bottles containing bleach also lacked the familiar bleach scent.

Initial field-testing showed that the products contained water. Further CBP laboratory testing indicated that the primary ingredient in many of the items sampled was only water and not what labeling suggested.

A representative from the Clorox Company also advised CBP that the Spanish labeled product was not permitted for sale in the U.S. and importation is a violation.

All products were seized pending further investigation.

CBP.gov (March 2020) CBP Officers in El Paso Seize Large Shipment of Altered and Prohibited Household Cleaning Products